Photo on Unsplash by Polina Kovaleva

By Sandra Corrado

It’s that time of year where we feel the pressure to make resolutions. Everybody else seems to be doing it, and we believe that if we make them, we’ll undoubtedly meet our goal(s). 

Unfortunately, research indicates that only 8-9% of people actually achieve their New Year’s resolutions. Most people fail within weeks, sometimes months. Why? There’s a number of reasons, which can be sorted into three categories:

  • Your goals might not be in line with your values.

It’s important to set goals according to what’s really most important to us. For example, many wish to become wealthy. However, if family is our highest value and saving and investing money is, say, our tenth value (we usually only fulfill our top three to five values), then we’ll spend all of our money on things related to our family, such as food, clothing, lessons, educational items, etc and we probably won’t get around to saving money. 

How do we know our values? We can ask ourselves how and where we spend our time, money, and energy. What do we surround ourselves with? The answers are clues, and once we know them, we rank them in order from the most frequent answer (the highest) to the least. When we set goals according to our highest values, the chances of reaching our goals increases dramatically. 

For an enlightening exercise, check out the “Determine Your Values” page under the “Discover” tab at Dr. John Demartini’s website (www.drdemartini.com).

  • You don’t break your goals down into smaller steps.

The best way to create goals is to use positive and present language and the SMART method, which means making goals that are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Reasonable, and Timely.  

For example, you might want to lose weight, a common New Year’s resolution. Your plan might look like this:

“By September 2021, my BMI is 22% and I weigh 135 lbs. I replace refined foods and sugar with healthier choices such as fruit and raw vegetables. I exercise four times a week for 30 minutes each session, alternating between cardio, muscle conditioning, and yoga; on non-workout days I walk for 20 minutes and/or do 20 squats, 20 pushups, and a one-minute plank as soon as I wake up in the morning. I have energy to get myself through the day and to play with my children.”

  • You don’t take your personality into account.

At times, we may attempt to follow other peoples’ styles in setting or trying to reach our goals. However, when we do this, we often don’t take our personality into account. 

According to Carl Jung, the notable German psychologist, there are four personality styles. Everyone has all four, but the intensity of the styles or “Ways” is different for each of us and in the way we manifest or act. For example, someone whose Primary Way is “Organized” needs to have a plan and a list, noting exactly what needs to be done and when. An individual whose Primary Way is “Action-oriented” loves to have fun and be spontaneous, and may appear erratic, unscheduled, and disorganized to an “Organized” person, whose last Way is “Action.” Someone who is “Relationship-oriented” likely loves to work in a group, as that’s an opportunity to connect with others, socialize, and learn. A “Logical” individual may prefer autonomy, creating their own workout or working on their own, particularly if they’re introverted. 

In summary, remember to always “do you;” align your goals with your values, break them down into more manageable pieces, and make a plan that works with your way of being you!

Sandra Corrado

BIO: 

Sandra is an integrative wellness coach, a certified fitness instructor, and a personal trainer with a background in human resources and human behavioral science. Her love of wellness, fitness, and learning began as a child. She has been coaching since 2001, and leading fitness classes and personal training sessions since 2005.

Sandra’s holistic approach to wellness and coaching includes addressing the mind, body, and spirit using universal principles, behavioral methodologies, breathwork, mindfulness, visualization, essential oils, Reiki, sound healing, personal fitness, and more.

You can contact her by calling (416) 729-1560 or emailing  scorrado@nextlevels.ca. Visit www.nextlevels.ca to learn more.